The Power of My Black Hand

When I was an undergraduate at NC State University, I was a counselor for the African American Symposium, a per-orientation experience welcoming new undergrads to NC State and helping them get a strong positive start as an African American scholar. I hate I didn’t attend as a freshman myself. There is a poem by Lance Jeffers (1972) that was read to the incoming freshmen, and it gave me so much strength and sense of purpose and power. It helped that it was read by a legendary faculty member and Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity brother, Dr. Lawrence Clark. I had the opportunity to read this poem to a room full of students today, kicking off our African American Read-In at Rochester Community and Technical College. I am so blessed to have had people and experiences in my life to remind me of my own power. I hope this poem can remind you of yours. 
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Understanding and Managing Privilege

In my work, discussions of privilege and power come up a lot – and actually should come up more. Talking about privilege and power is not meant for trivial coffee conversations either. It is a matter that impacts us every day of our lives, no matter your many social identities. When I find resources that help talk about privilege in a way that will be heard, I want to shout it from the rooftops. So here is my rooftop, and here is me shouting.

Read…marinate…read again…marinate…then post this everywhere you can. Much appreciation to his author for adding to this conversation in a way that many and more can get….and many and more will miss. But it’s good all the same. I humbly share this from http://www.robot-hugs.com/?attachment_id=894Privilege-clean

 

Dr. Anthony

You Are Stronger Than You Think

It has been about two months since I last blogged, and I have missed it a great deal. I have much to say about my life and my ah-ha’s over the last two months, but I want to start with focusing on those reading this. I am preparing to do a webinar on responding to bias incidents on college campuses tomorrow, and due to some other student crises I’ve been managing as of late, I think it’s important to share a quote that resonates when doing this work. It is also particularly powerful as students prepare to tackle finals and face commencement. Facing uncertain job markets and being unsure of yourself can be debilitating, even for the most accomplished of us. So these words are for you:

“I can be changed by what happens to me. I refuse to be reduced by it. In the face of such uncertainty believe in these two things – you are stronger than you think, and you are not alone.”

~Maya Angelou

To all those recent initiates into fraternities and sororities I know you understand the value of these words. What the master poet Maya Angelou reminds us of, is that we can do so much more than we think. And that if we just take a moment to look around, there is help everywhere. So despite your trials and struggles right now – take some ownership in the great work you have done thus far, and take a moment to count (literally count) your blessings and friends. If you are short in the “true friends” category, then it’s time to make some new ones. In the meantime lean on me and others like me to be a sounding board and word of encouragement as you transition yet again from one chapter to the next. Take care people, of yourself and each other, and never forget your own strength.Image